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putin. remember this image from back in june? say a little frosty you think between putin and obama? nsa leaker ed snowden has been granted asylum through vladmir putin in russia to remain there up through one year. it could be extended. perhaps after hanking out at the airport for a month 1/2. there are a lot of questions if a united states president and sit side by side with vladmir putin at a time when he granted american citizen, snowden asylum. that may not happen. at the same time the g20 summit will take place in st. petersburg, russia. we have all reason to think that will take place and there will be a moment where the president and vladmir putin will see each other and talk to each other and perhaps see a picture other than the one frozen in time. >> that will be interesting. bill: president obama speaking on the global terror threat for the first time to jay leno on late night. was the set after late-night talk show for the comments that have now closed 20 u.s. embassies? we'll debate that. >> the shooter questioning the victims. major nidal hasan with his opening statement th
. >> critics are refuting many claims the obama administration made by the nsa data collection program. that is leaving many worried about the security of their personal information and wondering whether or not the agency is playing by the rules. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has more now from washington. hi, catherine. have we reach ad tipping. >> reporter: patti ann, according to aclu at least 20 pieces of legislation are being considered to modify the nsa program adding the white house continues to disappoint its base on the issue. >> i think the white house has lost credibility and i think the government generally has been operating with a deficit of trust in the area of surveillance for the past few years. they have been saying one thing publicly to congress and to the courts and turns out that quite another thing has been taking place behind closed doors. >> reporter: in the end the aclu alleges that the nsa plays word games under the set of rules known as the united states intelligence directive 18, collecting data only applies when the data is analyzed and
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
-- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns. >> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won'
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
everything i posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very briefly about the nsa, and that is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. what the nsa has been doing him as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts of what they call metadata on your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was recently disclosed, and the problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
temporary asylum to nsa leaker and american fugitive edward snowden. that's snowden leaving the airport where he had been holed up for more than a month. the move could derail a scheduled summit meeting between presidents obama and putin. cnn matthew chance following developments for us. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. that's right. absolute fury being expressed by officials in the wraits that russia has made this decision to grant edward snowden a political asylum for at least one year. he walked out of the airport. had been couped up for about a month. you see him walking with his lawyers into relative freedom of russia wra, though it's not clear just how free he will be. at the moment his location is being kept secret. his lawyers say that's because edward snowden himself fears for his own safety. he says he believes u.s. intelligence officers, because of the controversial nature of his position, are chasing him. we also understand from the lawyer of edward snowden as well, the russian lawyer, that is, that he will be living with american sit sfwlenz who are living in the ru
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
for the reporting from cleveland. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden is free and any moment now may be speaking for the first time since russia dpragranted him a year-long asylum. apparently he's staying with some americans he met online and even has a job waiting for him if he wants it. phil black joins us live from moscow this morning. good morning, phil. >> good morning, chris. the job offer comes from a founder of a popular networking site often described as the russian version of facebook. the lawyer says he's surrounding himself by people he thinks he can trust, people who reached out to him online while stranded at the airport and he says they include american citizens. that man with his back to the camera is edward snowden and this was the moment he left moscow's airport after six weeks ther there. he's' according to his lawyer who is standing next to him in the photo. this document grants snowden permission to live in russia for one year which also keeps him beyond the reach of the united states for that time. ku kucharena describes his location as secret and safe. >> translator: he sa
to show you this banner headline in the "washington journal" this morning. an audit said that the n.s.a. repeatedly broke privacy rules who has been on this story for quite some time. writes this morning that the n.s.a. overstep its legal authorities thousands of times this year -- host: back to the egypt question about aid. bob is hanging on in manassas, virginia, democrat. thank you for waiting, bob. caller: yeah, we should not pull the funding. if we do, we will support the radicals. the only stabilizing force in egypt is the military. they're western professional folks. they do not -- they're not like a third world country like the folks in south america. these guys are trying to stabilize the situation. they responded because the brotherhood was taunting them. they did overrespond, but the brotherhood after they got the -- that's going on, they went and destroyed 50 churches and christian organizations in egypt has retaliation. they're hiding in the buildings. judah is exactly correct. there should not be allowed to be empowered to the same type of folks who were in iran when they
friend. four others were indicted for their alleged roles in that sexual assault. >>> the nsa's domestic surveillance network much larger than officials had been willing to disclose publicly according to current and former nsa officials who spoke to "the wall street journal." they tell the newspaper the agency has the capacity to access 75% of all u.s. internet communications, and that it is keeping the content of many e-mails sent between u.s. citizens. >>> you might recall the navy vet who woke up in a california hospital speaking only swedish with no memory of his american life? he is now in sweden, trying to piece together his past. 61-year-old michael boatwright was reunited tuesday with a woman he once dated in the 1980s. mental health officials in california bought him a one-way ticket after he made it clear he wanted to live in sweden. >>> a scary moment caught on camera, a truck flying over a guardrail, happened in michigan. the 17-year-old who shot this video said she had seen the truck driver hit a sign in the middle of the median. she took out her phone and started shooting w
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
not have any further announcements. i am wanting to ask about the nsa's surveillance programs. the threat that they have identified help bolster the case that the surveillance is needed? >> i will not blend those two stories, or those two issues together. haveve a threat that we advised the public about. we have discussed with you in the media, and we are interacting with that threat. we have some issues with unauthorized disclosure of classified inspiration. -- information. we are in a debate about that. we have to protect our security, and the balance in providing security, and protecting privacy is something we are working on. we are working on what that threat represents, and how we can act against it paid we also want to ensure the protection and security of our american people here at home and abroad. i would not blend the two issues. operationally, if the aq kior is weakened, doesn't make it easier, or harder, in terms of all cried as ability to organize a worldwide attack? that some counterterrorism experts might be able to address this with greater detail. the al qaeda core a hea
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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